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dialysis nurse relaxation

Decompress: 5 Relaxation Tips for Dialysis Nurses

Being a dialysis nurse is rewarding, but it can also be stressful.  Between long shifts and intense situations, you can easily feel worn out after working in dialysis day after day.  It is important to take time to decompress so that you don’t become burnt out.  You want to be the best you can be for your patients, and that means taking care of yourself.  Wondering how to relax?  Here are five things you can try.

1. Try meditating or breathing exercises

If you’re trying to figure out how to relax, meditation will probably be one of the first options people give you.  It can be very calming and help you reset yourself.  There are many apps and videos available to teach you how to meditate.  Even doing something simple like paying attention to how you are breathing can have a similar effect.  This doesn’t have to be something that takes a long time, either.  Stopping for a minute to breathe can make a world of difference.

  1. Listen to music

It has been proven that music affects our mood.  Taking time each day to listen to calming tunes can actually reduce stress.  It is an easy thing to work into your routine, too, no matter how busy your schedule.  Just listen to a few of your favorite songs on your commute to and from your dialysis nursing job.  It doesn’t necessarily have to be soft music, either.  Whatever helps you destress is the right choice.

  1. Stay connected

Being a dialysis nurse takes a lot of time and energy.  It can be easy to use all your free time to sleep, but this is hazardous to your mental health.  Humans are social creatures.  We need to stay connected with each other in order to thrive.  Make sure you are hanging out with friends and family outside of work. 

You’ve probably heard the phrase “laughter is the best medicine,” and it’s true.  Finding things to laugh about, whether alone or with friends, can actually boost your mood.  Keeping up with friends doesn’t have to become a source of stress, either.  A weekly phone call or simple text can be enough to know you’re thinking of each other and boost each other’s spirits.

  1. Exercise

This may seem like the opposite of what you want to do.  As a dialysis nurse, you are likely on your feet for most of the day.  Exercise is the last thing on your mind when you get home.  It has been proven, however, that exercising can improve not only your physical but also your mental health.  Even something simple like going for a walk or doing a few yoga poses can get your endorphins pumping.  Staying healthy in general is important to self-care.  This means eating well, drinking water, and getting enough sleep.

  1. Practice thankfulness

One last simple way to decompress: be grateful for what you have.  It can be easy to get caught up in the day to day and forget what brought you to dialysis in the first place.  Whether you have your dream job, love where you live, or just had a really good cup of coffee this morning, focus on things to be thankful for each and every day.  You’ll have a more positive attitude and be less worried.

Looking for a new dialysis job?

Maybe it’s your workplace that is causing you a lot of stress.  In that case, you could try a new one.  New Directions Staffing can help you find a position as a dialysis nurse almost anywhere in the country.  Call (888) 654-1110 for more information. 

A young dialysis nurse with library as the background.

Education Requirements to Become a Dialysis Nurse 

Ever wondered what education is needed to become a dialysis nurse? Dialysis is the process of cleaning a patient’s blood and removing waste from it. These nurses are specialists that work with patients who have renal disease and other kidney-related health issues. Dialysis services help these patients who have kidney failure filter out the waste and any unnecessary fluids in their blood. 

What Does a Dialysis Nurse Do?

A dialysis nurse provides care to various types of patients. They see and treat patients who have illnesses that have compromised their kidneys, which results in kidney disease. These nurses are responsible for explaining the procedure to patients and setting up the necessary equipment used for the procedure. This equipment includes the hemodialysis machines. 

Dialysis nurses are also responsible for making sure all safety precautions are followed. They must administer the dialysis treatment and monitor the well-being of the patient throughout the treatment. They must also report all progress or issues to physicians. All dialysis nurses work in dialysis clinics or hospitals. They may also assist patients who take home dialysis treatments. 

Dialysis Nurse Education

Colleges and universities do not offer a specific dialysis nurse degree or education. Instead, to become a dialysis nurse, you will need to earn your bachelor’s degree in nursing. You may also apply for an associate’s degree in nursing to earn your RN license, however, a BSN leads to better pay and more job opportunities. Some nurses earn their RN licensure after they receive their ADN degree, then return to school to get their BSN afterward. 

Once you have earned either your BSN or ADN degree, you will need to pass the state registered nurse exam to become a licensed RN. You will need to work for at least one year, possibly two as an RN to gain real-world experience before you apply to become a dialysis nurse. There are some dialysis facilities and other employers that require you to become certified as a dialysis nurse before getting hired. Nurses can receive this certification through the Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission. 

How to Be a Good Dialysis Nurse 

Good dialysis nurses have a well-rounded set of skills. All dialysis procedures require acute attention to detail. These nurses are connecting complex machines to patients’ bodies and any small mistake could lead to a major problem. Therefore good communication and being able to focus on the task even if other things are happening in the background are two traits that a good dialysis nurse should have. 

These nurses must be well educated and have training in all areas of hemodialysis. The main priority of these nurses is the overall health and safety of their patients. A dialysis nurse needs to be able to fully explain the process of dialysis to new patients. It is also essential that these nurses have excellent social skills. Patients on dialysis often receive their treatment for prolonged periods. 

The process takes several hours to complete in most cases. Therefore the dialysis nurses have the opportunity to build up a rapport with their patients during this time. This means they will often build a strong relationship and have a genuine concern for the patients they treat regularly. Good bedside manner is very important since many of these patients will require dialysis services for years to come. 

Find a New Job as a Dialysis Nurse At New Directions Staffing 

Are you a dialysis nurse in search of new opportunities? Why not give travel nursing a try? Visit new places as you help out a variety of patients as well as your fellow nurses by finding a job at the New Directions Staffing website.

A nurse putting on protective gear to minimize COVID-19 spread.

How Nurses Can Minimize Risks of COVID-19 in Dialysis Facilities

Patients who receive dialysis treatment are at a higher risk of COVID-19. Nurses that work in dialysis facilities need to take preventative measures to minimize the risk of transmitting the disease between patients and themselves. Some of the preventative measures include educating themselves, staff members, and patients about the virus and screening patients and staff for the virus. Another important aspect is to separate the infected patients. 

What Dialysis Nurses Need to Know 

The WHO (World Health Organization) acknowledged the novel coronavirus disease as a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. Patients who are on routine dialysis are likely to be at a higher risk of COVID-19 and its complications. That’s because these people are usually older. In addition, they may have multiple conditions that suppress their immune systems like hypertension or diabetes. 

If you have several patients in the same small enclosed area, it increases the risk of catching the virus. Therefore, the appropriate strategies need to be put into place to ensure the facility and staff are preventing the spread of the virus. 

Here is some more information on what all dialysis nurses should know when caring for patients at the facility. 

Education 

Health care workers and patients should be educated on preventative measures while giving and receiving care during the pandemic. Hand and respiratory hygiene are at the top of the list of most important things, as well as coughing etiquette. When it is time to educate patients, caregivers should use terminology easy to understand and no medical jargon. All healthcare workers need to be educated on the use of PPE and should practice how to use it correctly. Ongoing education efforts are the key to helping prevent health care worker transmission of COVID-19. 

Patient Screening 

One of the best things that dialysis nurses can help with the screening process is calling the patients before they come. During the call, they can ask if the patient has any of the common COVID-19 symptoms. This approach is reliant on staff availability and therefore the screening process will be different for every dialysis facility. Face masks and hand sanitizers should be provided for all patients. Each patient needs to be at least six feet away from one another. And every facility needs to put together a triage plan to transfer patients for appropriate testing that is site-specific.

How to Manage Infected Patients 

Patients who show symptoms or are positive for COVID-19 should wear face masks to prevent the spread to others. And all symptomatic patients need to be at least six feet from everyone else. Some dialysis centers mandate the use of a face mask for every patient. All patients who are on home dialysis should be treated with the same protocols as those who are on-site when they attend the outpatient clinics. 

Become a Travel Nurse and Help in Dialysis Facilities 

Right now throughout the country, medical facilities like dialysis centers are needing additional help from nurses than ever before. If you have experience as a dialysis nurse and would like to give travel nursing a try, visit New Directions Staffing today to check out the current job listings.

dialysis nurse

How to Become a Dialysis Nurse

Dialysis nurses play a vital role in healthcare as they assist patients with renal failure with routine life-saving treatment. Dialysis nurses work with those who have kidney disease. They are a lifeline to patients who undergo this procedure. While they often work in facilities that are close to home, it is also very common for a dialysis nurse to travel to nearby cities and work temporarily at dialysis centers that are short-staffed. This means those who are interested in travel nursing could benefit from training to become a dialysis nurse because it would open up more job opportunities for them. 

Job Description for a Dialysis Nurse 

The job requirements include helping patients whose kidneys no longer function as they should. Because the kidneys are needed to regulate our bodily fluids and electrolytes, as well as dispose of harmful impurities and toxins, it is very important to have treatment such as dialysis available to these patients. 

Dialysis treatment works to substitute the normal, healthy functions of the kidneys and prevents kidney failure from occurring. A dialysis nurse is capable of providing two types of dialysis treatment, hemodialysis, and peritoneal dialysis. 

Dialysis nurses use various types of special equipment that takes care of patients during treatment. It is the nurse’s job to monitor patients before, during, and after the dialysis treatment. Also, dialysis nurses provide guidance for patients on how to properly manage their dialysis sites and their overall health. This can include providing tips and advice on healthy diet habits or what activities they should avoid following treatment. Dialysis nurses also help to make sure all the equipment is working properly for their patients. 

What are the Requirements to Be a Dialysis Nurse?

There are several requirements that a dialysis nurse must meet to provide care to patients. They must graduate from an accredited college or university. It can take between 1 to 4 years to earn a diploma or a degree in nursing. Additionally, you will need an additional 1 to 2 years to earn a master’s degree. There are options to complete your degree through an online nursing program which is a popular option for many of today’s busy travel nurses. You can find accelerated and advanced nursing programs available from many accredited online schools. 

You must be a registered nurse to work as a dialysis nurse. This means they must complete their NCLEX-RN before they obtain a certification to become a dialysis nurse. Dialysis nurses require additional certification to earn their special nursing credentials. 

What is the Salary? 

The salary for a dialysis nurse depends on several factors such as their level of education, experience, and location. The average annual salary for these nurses is reported to be $69,381. There are several opportunities to add on additional wages. 

An entry-level position for a dialysis nurse is around $50,000 annually. Also, with 1 to 4 years of experience, dialysis nurses can expect to make a salary of $52,000 on average. Dialysis nurses that have between 5 to 9 years of experience can expect to receive an average of $60,000 annually. And those with 10 to 19 years of experience often receive $68,000 per year or more. 

Find a Job as a Dialysis Nurse at New Directions Staffing 

If you are looking for a change of pace from your regular nursing job, why not consider working as a travel nurse for a dialysis facility? By training to be a dialysis nurse, you will open up new doors for your medical career as you provide comfort and reassurance to patients with renal disease. Contact New Directions Staffing today for more information.

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3 Ways to Reduce Coronavirus Exposure During Dialysis

In the age of social distancing, there are still many necessary tasks we need to complete that require us to be closer than suggested. Healthcare workers have been working on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. However, other important health care needs still matter. This includes those services offered at Dialysis centers. These life-saving facilities are essential for patients all throughout the country. The medical experts who work at these facilities must ensure they do not transmit the harmful virus to their vulnerable patients. 

Caring for a High-Risk Group During a Pandemic 

Data collected in 2017 showed that there were around 750,000 individuals in the U.S. who had the end-stage renal disease (ESRD). At that time, the majority of them were treated using hemodialysis. 

Just having ESRD puts patients at a much higher risk of catching COVID-19 and having severe complications from the virus. Many individuals with ESRD are older and have other health complications. This places them in an even higher risk group during the pandemic. 

As the threat of the virus grew, many dialysis patients had concerns about how they would get the help they needed during this dangerous time. Some believe reducing their visits to the dialysis facility for treatment may help. But, that could actually cause some individuals to place themselves at an even higher health risk. 

For dialysis patients, the best way to protect yourself from COVID-19 is to find ways to minimize your exposure. All while still receiving the life-saving treatment you need. 

Here are 3 Ways Dialysis Centers are Minimizing Exposure to Patients During COVID-19

Minimizing Exposure 

Since the news of the coronavirus first broke, many dialysis facilities across the country began to take action quickly to protect their patients. However, most dialysis centers aren’t designed to cater to the needs of patients during a serious pandemic. Most dialysis centers are small locations that only have enough room for the patients they see each day and nothing else. These patients are often in close-quarters which can make things difficult during the current COVID-19 crisis. 

Segregating Dialysis Centers 

Near the end of March, some dialysis centers started designating certain shifts and even entire centers for patients confirmed or believed COVID-19 positive. A 3-tier system now exists. The first tier was for asymptomatic patients. The second was for those who possibly had infections. The third was for those confirmed to have the virus. While this method has worked well for some and there are plans to expand segregating dialysis centers throughout the country, there are some facilities with limited space or those that see too many patients who are unable to do this. 

Fewer Hours Spent at the Facility 

Several dialysis organizations have considered the idea of reducing dialysis patient’s hours. They feel that doing so would help to minimize the spread. While this is not optimal for some patients, those who can cut down without hindering their overall health are advised to do so, at least until social distancing is lifted. Of course, patients should always consult with their doctors first before they decide to cut down on dialysis treatments. Their doctor will know whether it is in the patient’s best interest to cut down on dialysis treatments. 

Find Work as a Dialysis Nurse and Do Your Part During the Coronavirus Pandemic 

If you have experience working as a dialysis nurse and would like to give travel nursing a try, New Directions Staffing has the opportunity for you. Learn more about current jobs available by visiting their website today. 

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Top 5 Reasons Dialysis Nursing Pays Off

So you’ve finished your nursing degree, or maybe you already have several years of experience under your belt, and you are looking to advance your career.  One of the best ways to do that is to become a specialized nurse. There are many different specializations open to RNs.  Dialysis can be a great direction to take your nursing career.  Here are five reasons why.

1. Dialysis nurses are in high demand.

There is a nationwide shortage of nurses. However, the demand is especially high for specialized nurses.  Hospitals are looking for nurses with higher education and specific skills. The U.S. population is aging, and more older people means more need for healthcare providers.  As the rate of kidney diseases is increasing, the need for dialysis nurses is growing as well. According to the National Kidney Foundation, as many as one in three Americans are at risk of developing chronic kidney disease.  Now is a great time to see if this is the specialty for you.

2. Dialysis is life-saving and effective.

What is dialysis?  Put simply, it uses technology to do the work of kidneys.  It filters excess water and toxins from the blood. Dialysis is used to treat patients with kidney stones, kidney transplants, chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease.  Without it, some of these illnesses can be fatal.

Many of the diseases dialysis is needed for are chronic. They require patients to get treatment three or four times a week. Therefore, dialysis nurses get to form close relationships with their patients.  This helps make this nursing a rewarding career.  Even if you are a travel nurse, you will still you know are improving the quality of your patients’ daily lives through your work.

3. Dialysis nurses are paid well.

One of the top reasons that dialysis nursing pays off is that it literally pays.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average dialysis nurse makes between $44,000 and $95,000 per year.  Of course, this range is so wide because it includes a variety of states and levels of expertise. Many healthcare facilities offer high salaries and great benefits to attract and keep nurses.  These can include everything from auto allowances to 401K plans to housing stipends. The longer you work in dialysis and increase your expertise, the more your salary will grow.

4. Work with the newest technology.

Rapidly changing technology is affecting a wide range of industries from marketing to education.  Nursing is being impacted as well. As technology progresses, dialysis treatment gets better. Dialysis nurses get to learn about and work with the most advanced technology in their field.  This is a great opportunity for growth not only in meeting patients’ needs but also professionally for the nurses. Speaking of professional development…

5. Opportunities for professional development.

As you have probably already figured out, healthcare facilities love dialysis nurses.  Because of this, they often invest in more training and development for their nurses. Nurses are eligible for outstanding performance awards, promotion to higher-level positions, and increased salaries over time.  Of course, all of these things depend on each nurse’s education, commitment, and personal growth, but dialysis nursing, in general, offers many opportunities for career advancement.

Sound like the job for you?

Are you interested in becoming a dialysis nurse?  New Directions Staffing Services can find your first job.  We help people get to travel, temporary-to-hire, and full-time work in both clinical and administrative jobs within the healthcare industry.  Once you’ve completed your training, call (888) 654-1110 or contact us through our website so we can help you find the perfect position.

dialysis nursing

Dialysis Nursing: Is It a Good Fit for You?

Dialysis nursing has become an in-demand profession over the past few decades. Analysts project nursing careers to grow by 15% until 2026, much faster than the national average of other professions. This is because more and more nurses are in demand in the healthcare industry as the population ages.
 
This drastic increase in demand for healthcare staff is often more than a medical facility can keep up with. This is why travel nurses play such an important role. Traveling nurses travel across the country, filling in gaps where needed.
 
Dialysis nurses are one of the most sought out traveling nurses today. The number of dialysis patients is on the rise, requiring frequent treatments to prevent kidney failure.
 
Each new job location has its own challenges, but travel nursing is rewarding and lucrative. Here is everything you need to know about dialysis nursing and whether this profession is right for you.
 

What is Dialysis?

 
Dialysis is a treatment used to stabilize the functions of the kidney. This helps avoid kidney failure, a deadly disease. It is a clinical process that purifies the blood. But, this is a temporary solution for supporting the function of the kidneys. This is why dialysis treatments are usually needed frequently, and thus these nurses in high demand. Dialysis is also needed when a patient starts to develop end-stage kidney failure. This is a critical condition where the patient loses about 85 to 90 percent of their kidney function.
 
As the kidneys start to fail, dialysis stabilizes the patient’s body by:
 
  • Removing waste, toxins, salt, and extra water, preventing the substances from building up in the body
  • Maintaining a safe level of necessary minerals in the blood, such as potassium, sodium, and bicarbonate.
  • Aiding other systems in the body with regulating blood pressure.
 

What Does a Dialysis Nurse Do?

 
Dialysis nurses provide patients the necessary treatments they need by administering life-prolonging procedures such as a dialysis treatment process. They are part of a much larger specialty also known in the medical field as nephrology nursing. They also have a wide and in-depth knowledge of kidney diseases and their respective treatments. Dialysis nurses have a responsibility to support, medicate, and track patients throughout their treatment process. They also must educate patients about their conditions and counsel them on various lifestyle choices.
 

Why Become a Traveling Nurse?

 
There are a lot of reasons why you should become a Traveling Dialysis Nurse, but here are some of the highlights you might want to consider:
 

A Flexible Work Schedule

 
Dialysis nurse positions vary depending on the length of time of the assignment and the location. You are able to specify your positions based on your needs. Travelling can be exciting but also tiring. But, having the flexible work schedule of a travel nurse allows you to take necessary rest between assignments. In some agencies, you can even arrange your weekly schedule to allow for long weekends and shorter workweeks.
 

The Adventure of a Lifetime

 
One of the main reasons to become a traveling nurse is having the chance to explore. Being paid to travel the country is one of the best jobs available. You get to take in beautiful sights across the country while earning a competitive salary and benefits.
 

Learn New Skills

 
You will be able to improve your nursing skills while developing a wide variety of other skills. Working in various locations, assignments, and teams force you to think critically. Changing assignments teach you to adapt to diverse working environments and groups.
 

How to Become a Dialysis Nurse?

 
Now you have seen the wonderful opportunities that a traveling nurse has to offer. To become one you have to complete all the necessary requirements of your travel agency.
 
The main requirement is having an Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in Nursing. Any experience with the dialysis process is also a big plus. You will also have to take the NCLEX-RN exam and get a state license.
 
New Directions Staffing can help you find the best Dialysis Nurse jobs that fit your skills.