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dialysis nursing

Dialysis Nursing: Is It a Good Fit for You?

Dialysis nursing has become an in-demand profession over the past few decades. Analysts project nursing careers to grow by 15% until 2026, much faster than the national average of other professions. This is because more and more nurses are in demand in the healthcare industry as the population ages.
 
This drastic increase in demand for healthcare staff is often more than a medical facility can keep up with. This is why travel nurses play such an important role. Traveling nurses travel across the country, filling in gaps where needed.
 
Dialysis nurses are one of the most sought out traveling nurses today. The number of dialysis patients is on the rise, requiring frequent treatments to prevent kidney failure.
 
Each new job location has its own challenges, but travel nursing is rewarding and lucrative. Here is everything you need to know about dialysis nursing and whether this profession is right for you.
 

What is Dialysis?

 
Dialysis is a treatment used to stabilize the functions of the kidney. This helps avoid kidney failure, a deadly disease. It is a clinical process that purifies the blood. But, this is a temporary solution for supporting the function of the kidneys. This is why dialysis treatments are usually needed frequently, and thus these nurses in high demand. Dialysis is also needed when a patient starts to develop end-stage kidney failure. This is a critical condition where the patient loses about 85 to 90 percent of their kidney function.
 
As the kidneys start to fail, dialysis stabilizes the patient’s body by:
 
  • Removing waste, toxins, salt, and extra water, preventing the substances from building up in the body
  • Maintaining a safe level of necessary minerals in the blood, such as potassium, sodium, and bicarbonate.
  • Aiding other systems in the body with regulating blood pressure.
 

What Does a Dialysis Nurse Do?

 
Dialysis nurses provide patients the necessary treatments they need by administering life-prolonging procedures such as a dialysis treatment process. They are part of a much larger specialty also known in the medical field as nephrology nursing. They also have a wide and in-depth knowledge of kidney diseases and their respective treatments. Dialysis nurses have a responsibility to support, medicate, and track patients throughout their treatment process. They also must educate patients about their conditions and counsel them on various lifestyle choices.
 

Why Become a Traveling Nurse?

 
There are a lot of reasons why you should become a Traveling Dialysis Nurse, but here are some of the highlights you might want to consider:
 

A Flexible Work Schedule

 
Dialysis nurse positions vary depending on the length of time of the assignment and the location. You are able to specify your positions based on your needs. Travelling can be exciting but also tiring. But, having the flexible work schedule of a travel nurse allows you to take necessary rest between assignments. In some agencies, you can even arrange your weekly schedule to allow for long weekends and shorter workweeks.
 

The Adventure of a Lifetime

 
One of the main reasons to become a traveling nurse is having the chance to explore. Being paid to travel the country is one of the best jobs available. You get to take in beautiful sights across the country while earning a competitive salary and benefits.
 

Learn New Skills

 
You will be able to improve your nursing skills while developing a wide variety of other skills. Working in various locations, assignments, and teams force you to think critically. Changing assignments teach you to adapt to diverse working environments and groups.
 

How to Become a Dialysis Nurse?

 
Now you have seen the wonderful opportunities that a traveling nurse has to offer. To become one you have to complete all the necessary requirements of your travel agency.
 
The main requirement is having an Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in Nursing. Any experience with the dialysis process is also a big plus. You will also have to take the NCLEX-RN exam and get a state license.
 
New Directions Staffing can help you find the best Dialysis Nurse jobs that fit your skills.
dialysis nurse

Benefits of Being a Dialysis Nurse in 2019

Working as a dialysis nurse is a booming career. Dialysis has become one of the most acclaimed methods of taking care of kidney patients. It helps in treating a diverse range of diseases and disease processes. These include kidney stones, kidney transplants, Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), and End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

If you are like most dialysis nurses, you want to play a role in helping individuals with kidney health needs. This and the competitive dialysis nurse salary are perhaps the reason you want to pursue this profession. Before you do, it might help if you examine all the benefits that dialysis nursing has to offer in 2019.

Dialysis Nurse Job Prospects Are on The Rise

The growing rates of kidney diseases, increased emphasis on preventive care and the need for healthcare services from baby boomers, have the demand for dialysis nurses growing in 2019. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that dialysis nurse jobs will increase by 15% between 2016 and 2026. Therefore, this means that now is the perfect time to get started if you’re considering becoming a dialysis nurse.

Exposure to Modern Technology

The explosion of technological changes in 2019 is revolutionizing virtually every industry. Dialysis nursing is not immune to this influence. Although many might see the innovations as a threat to their profession, they are, indeed, a blessing in disguise. As a result, new technology exposes dialysis nurses to advanced dialysis treatment, state-of-the-art equipment, and newer patient support services. This, in turn, presents excellent opportunities for exploring new skills within this field.

Skills and Expertise

By helping people with renal and other chronic kidney conditions, dialysis nurses have access to various resources and first-hand experiences in the field. This molds them into experts in their field and allows them to use their extensive expertise in caring for patients. As your experience and expertise improve, so will your salary.

Get Professional Development

Unlike most other professions, dialysis nurses have plenty of opportunity for career growth and advancement. Healthcare facilities often make regular investments in dialysis nurses’ training and development.  As a result, working as a dialysis nurse makes you eligible for awards that recognize outstanding performance, promotion to higher-level positions, and increased salary. However, keep in mind that overall professional growth and development is entirely dependent on your academic qualifications, experience, and dedication at work. 

Enjoy Relationships and Impact

Dialysis nurses usually work in hospital settings, physician offices, and clinics. Sometimes, they work under home healthcare agencies assisting at-home patients with kidney-related problems. Regardless of where you work, you will be surrounded by a team of co-workers daily. Since you are all working toward the same goal (in a collaborative environment), you can enjoy ever-present comradery and support.

On top of that, you get to interact with patients and their families. Above all, providing them with high-quality care gives you a chance to improve their lives daily.

Benefits and Perks

Most hospitals and healthcare facilities offer incredible perks in a bid to attract and retain dialysis nurses. These can range from auto allowances and 401K plans to generous housing stipends. 

Ready to Get Started?

If you have what it takes to start working a dialysis nurse, the team at New Directions is prepared to help you. Just contact us today. We will be more than happy to get you the best fit.

Be sure to sign up for our job alerts to get notified every time the ideal dialysis nurse jobs are available.

Travel nurse jobs

How a Travel Nurse Job Can Be Rewarding & Lucrative

A travel nurse job may be right for you if you have an undying love for healthcare, helping others, and experiencing new cultures! If you answered yes, a travel nurse job could be an excellent choice for you. It offers a unique opportunity for any Registered Nurse (RN) to practice their specialty while at the same time exploring the country. But that’s not all this career has to offer. There’s a whole lot of other reasons to become a travel nurse. In today’s post, we explore several benefits that make travel nursing such a rewarding and lucrative career.

Incredible Perks

One of the primary reasons why a career as a travel dialysis nurse holds a lot of appeal for many RNs is because it provides a wide array of benefits and perks. These include, among others, health, life, and liability insurance. 401K plans may also be included. Sometimes, travel nursing firms (also called staffing companies) offer access to continuing and higher education on top of the competitive travel nurse salary. Others pay for nurse’s licensure. The best bit is, most of these benefits are effective as soon as you sign the contract.

Travel Nurse Jobs Offer Choices and Flexibility

What separates travel nursing from a full-time position is the freedom of choice and flexibility. Almost always, travel nurses get to choose their work location as well as work schedules. Even better, special schedule requests and days off are agreed on well in advance. That means you and the nurse manager at the facility will always work out special needs that arise on a mutual basis. This kind of freedom is among the leading reasons why many Registered Nurses opt for travel nurse jobs. 

An Excellent Adventure

We all love experiencing new adventures. Unfortunately, it’s not always possible to get the time (and money) for a cross-country trip while holding a full-time staff position. But, working as a travel nurse gives you a chance to see different parts of the country while still making a difference in the lives of patients wherever you go.

See a Place Before Becoming a Permanent Resident

Are you looking for a new place to call home but can’t figure out where to settle? Working as a travel dialysis nurse may be a good way to explore different places before you choose where to settle. The 13-week period gives you ample time to know and get the actual feel of the area before you decide to become a permanent resident.

Free Housing

There’s no denying that housing, particularly in urban settings, is expensive. But, working as a travel nurse helps you eliminate this expenditure. This is because many travel nursing firms offer a tax-free stipend for quality housing close to your place of work.

Build Your Skills

If you’re looking for an excellent way to build your nursing skills and experience, travel nurse jobs are worth checking out. This gives you a rare opportunity to work in various top facilities across the country, allowing you a unique experience and perspective on multiple places. What’s even better, you get to work alongside other senior nurses and doctors. This, in turn, helps you grow your travel nurse salary even more.

New Directions Staffing

At New Directions, we recognize that travel nurses make up an essential part of the healthcare industry. That’s why we go the extra mile to ensure that you get the perfect opportunity that fits your specific needs. Whether you prefer working in snowy mountains or sunny beaches, just give us a call at 888-654-1110, and we’ll help you find exactly that.

dialysis nurse

Developing Nurse-Patient Relationships as a Dialysis Nurse

“My dialysis nurses are the best. They make me feel so comfortable during treatment. I feel like they really care about me.” Imagine your patients saying this about you.

For a patient receiving dialysis, their nurse can be the difference between a positive or negative experience. Dialysis nurses and their patients can form an unbreakable bond. One that will leave them remembering each other for the rest of their lifetimes. Of course, this is all dependent upon on the communication style of nurse that is working. 

Dialysis is an extremely time-consuming treatment for patients, oftentimes causing them to miss out on family and social events. Patients spend a majority of their time traveling to and from dialysis settings. Then, waiting to be attached to the machine, undergoing the actual dialysis treatment itself. If that weren’t enough they then spend time waiting to be discharged before going home.

Due to the involved nature of dialysis treatments, nurses can adjust their communication skills to make things more effortless and relaxed for the patient. Developing a true nurse-patient relationship can result in a smoother process for everybody involved.

One Study’s Findings on Dialysis Nurse Jobs

One study found in the Nursing Times found that dialysis nurses in the Republic of Ireland rarely communicated with their patients. They interviewed 16 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). They were undergoing hemodialysis therapy in a hospital-based setting, analyzing their findings along the way. 

In the end, the study found that the nurses only communicated with the patient when they had a physical or technical need. Patients described the communication as “shallow” and that it “rarely progressed beyond a superficial or clinical level.”

We understand that nurses are oftentimes extremely busy in a dialysis-based setting: answering the beeps of various machines, repeatedly checking each patient’s vitals, etc. Although, this study was published in the hopes of raising awareness about the type of communication they were receiving, not necessarily how much.

Quality Versus Quantity

This study described the quality versus quantity of nurse-patient communication. While patients said they understood their nurses couldn’t sit down with them and chat for thirty minutes, they said they’d appreciate more heart-to-heart and personal conversing. 

Since you can’t be with your patients for long, simple things will do the trick. Introduce yourself from the start, greet your patient by name, explain what you are doing throughout the process, and engage in active listening by repeating what they say back to them.

As a dialysis nurse, we understand the stress and drain that goes along with your job. Don’t put more pressure on yourself to do more, instead, enhance and improve what you already do.

Nonverbal Communication

The communication your patient appreciates isn’t always verbal. Here are a few nonverbal communication techniques to further develop your patient relationships as a certified dialysis nurse: 

  • Make eye contact — Even though you can’t be physically with your patient during their whole treatment, make eye contact with them from across the room. This lets them know you’re keeping an eye on them.
  • Smile — A smile can ease tension, build rapport, and increases happiness. Smiling at your patient can never be unappreciated.
  • Be confident — Nothing causes unease in a patient more than their nurse seeming unsure of what they are doing. Always be confident and professional in front of your patient.

If you or someone you know is on the hunt for dialysis nurse jobs or other healthcare clinical and administrative careers, consider looking into New Directions Staffing Services. Our travel nursing agency can provide individuals with travel, temporary-to-hire, and full-time opportunities in their field. Call (888) 654-1110 or visit our website for more information today!

A dialysis nurse with a patient.

What to Expect on a First Day as a Dialysis Nurse

As a certified dialysis nurse, you may be a little nervous about what to expect on your first day. No worries, all nurses have been in your position at one point in time! You will be fulfilling many duties and learning plenty of new things, on your first day as a dialysis nurse. One thing that’s important is to remember why you became a nurse in the first place.

The National Kidney Foundation reports that 30 million people in the United States are affected by Chronic Kidney Disease.  One in 3 Americans are at risk of developing it. With so many individuals requiring treatment for CKD, it’s important to have people like you to help them deal with their disease along the way. 

Patients have to stay still during the duration of their dialysis treatment. In some cases, the treatment may take hours. Depending on the position and responsibilities it may involve being available for the entire process from start to finish. Before learning about your daily duties, it is important to understand what type of dialysis you are performing for your patient. 

Types of Dialysis

The following are the different types of dialysis:

Hemodialysis — Patients can receive hemodialysis treatments in a dialysis center or in the comfort of their own homes, usually occurring 3 to 4 times per week. This treatment cleanses the patient’s blood by pumping it through a dialysis machine, cleaning it. It then reinstates it back into their body. This removes excess fluid and waste from their blood.

Peritoneal Dialysis — Unlike hemodialysis where the patient’s blood is removed from their body to be cleaned, patients receiving peritoneal dialysis have their blood cleaned inside their body. This procedure is done through the lining of the patient’s abdomen using a fluid that is changed periodically. This type of dialysis can be done anywhere.

Dialysis Nurse Duties

Dialysis nurse duties vary depending on the job but here are some common duties to review.

  • You will oversee the whole process — From the time the patient enters the building to when they leave, you will be the person who administers the treatment from the beginning to the end.
  • You will keep up with their vital signs — Each patient responds to dialysis treatments differently. So, you are responsible for consistently keeping an eye on their vitals. One reason is to make sure their blood pressure doesn’t drop too low, for example. While evaluating how they respond to the treatment, you may have to assist them with medications.
  • You will have to educate beyond treatment — Beyond helping them in the dialysis center or at their home, you should educate your patient about their disease, along with what they can do to help with a successful recovery. 
  • You will usually have long hours — Most dialysis nurses have to get up for work early and stay late. Although it can vary, some positions could require that you be prepared for unique schedules and shifts.
  • You will communicate with your patients — Beyond the health aspect of dialysis treatment, dialysis nurse jobs inevitably require you to talk with your patients verbally and nonverbally. How you communicate with your patients will reflect the experience they will have during treatment. 
  • You will form a relationship with your patients — Since you will be seeing a patient 3 to 4 times per week, for long hours at a clip at that, you will be forming a nurse-patient relationship of some sorts that will never be broken. This can be one of the most rewarding parts of your job. 

Interested in Being a Dialysis Nurse?

If you are interested in a career as a travel dialysis nurse, contact our travel nursing agency New Directions Staffing Services. We can provide individuals with travel, temporary-to-hire, and full-time opportunities in both clinical and administrative jobs within the healthcare industry. Call (888) 654-1110 or visit our website for more information today.

A dialysis nurse poses for a picture.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Becoming a Dialysis Nurse

Congratulations! You’ve passed the stage. You have your nursing degree in hand. Now you are left with only one thing to worry about! That’s finding a job as a travel dialysis nurse. More to the point? You’re wondering what will be expected of you the moment you get a job. The good news is that you have come to the right place. New Directions provides you with all the information you need to excel in this field. This includes the basic requirements and available employment opportunities.

Here are five important things you need to know about becoming a nephrology nurse.

Basic Job Requirements of a Dialysis Nurse

Dialysis nurses work in a hospital or home settings alongside other medical stuff. To become a nephrology nurse, one is required to have:

  • an associate’s or bachelor’s degree in nursing
  • pass the state licensing exam for nursing.

Experience with technical medical equipment is critical. Earning professional certification as a Certified Dialysis Nurse as well helps to improve your job prospects.

Important Qualities

Successful dialysis nurses possess a broad spectrum of clinical and administrative skills. The fact that you’ll be working alongside other individuals? Also, it means you must have clear communication skills and impeccable attention to details. Other essential qualities include:

  • critical thinking
  • organization
  • strong work ethic
  • the ability to work well in a team-focused environment
  • enjoys intellectual challenges.

Physical Demands

No doubt, dialysis is a very technical task. It involves intravenously wiring up patients to a dialysis machine. The dialysis machine filters the blood. The procedure takes a couple of hours. Patients must remain still the entire time. The process is demanding. So, physical stamina is mandatory to help you stand for more extended periods. Also, your job description may sometimes involve transferring of patients. That means you must be in a position to lift, move, transfer, or assist with the weight of more than one-hundred (100) pounds. In addition, visual acuity and excellent motor skills may help bring sheer convenience in your job.

Working Conditions in Dialysis Nursing

Dialysis can be administered in virtually any environment:

  • a hospital
  • patient’s home
  • freestanding clinic in prison or university.

Because patients need close monitoring at all times, working shifts may include days, nights, weekends, and holidays. Also, exposure to chemicals, needles, bodily fluids, and other infectious diseases may pose some serious health hazards.

Additionally, burnout is inevitable while working as a dialysis nurse. You spend a significant amount of time standing, walking, stretching, bending, or assisting with patient transfers. Therefore, you must have to ability to follow strict safety precautions. This is to prevent probable infection or injuries.

Salary Info and Career Outlook

Working as a travel dialysis nurse is very rewarding. It gives you a chance to provide life-saving support to patients. Also, it’s a stable career path with decent annual pay. According to BLS, the average salary range for a nephrology nurse falls between $44,000 and $95,000 per year. However, this varies widely based on the state, setting, or level of expertise.

There is an outburst of lifestyle disease and a rise of the elderly population in the country.  The demands for dialysis treatments are bound to increase. In fact, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 15% increase in dialysis nurse jobs between 2016 and 2026. In summation, it means you can never go wrong with a career as a nephrology nurse.

Dialysis Nursing Jobs

Are you searching for dialysis nursing jobs? Browse the New Directions’ website to see all the latest job opportunities for nephrology nurses available. Want to get notified the moment dialysis nursing jobs that match your search criteria are added to our database? Sign up for email job alerts today.

A nurse representing a travel nurse and travel nurse jobs.

Travel Nurses! Learn About a Great Placement for You

Your decision to become a dialysis nurse demonstrates that you are a hard-working, compassionate person. As such, you’ll find that the medical field offers a wide range of opportunities for a fulfilling career. For instance, travel nurse jobs are among the most exciting options available for you today.

Perks to Pursuing Travel Nurse Jobs

Aside from satisfying your sense of adventure, you’ll enjoy many other perks if you pursue a career in dialysis nurse jobs. Traveling nurses are typically well paid, plus they often receive moving expenses, living expenses, health insurance, and 401K plans.  Another fantastic perk is the ability to choose a warm climate in the winter or chose any major city you would like to call home.

Here are a few more benefits of dialysis nurse jobs:

Make a Network of Connections

With each new position you accept, you’ll be exploring opportunities across the nation.  In this way, you’ll have an idea of where you would like to settle permanently.

Grow Your Cultural Knowledge

This perk is crucial for anyone in the nursing industry.  With our increasingly diverse society, nurses need to be adept at communicating with people of different economic backgrounds, religions, races, and ethnicities.  As a traveling nurse, you’ll have an opportunity to hone these skills.

Help Those Who Need It the Most

With so many of our hospitals understaffed today, some patients suffer a decreased quality of care. In fact, understaffing has resulted in a demand for travel nurses today that is at a 20-year high.  By being where you’re needed most, you’ll protect patients and improve their outcomes.

Make More Money

Travel nursing pays more than the average nurse salary.  You can follow the money. Go where the salaries are higher and start building a retirement fund or pay off those student loans!

 

Free Housing and Travel Expenses

Yes, you can say goodbye to that shabby apartment or your mom’s basement.  Many travel nursing agencies offer free housing for their nurses. Some of the companies also foot the bill for travel expenses and relocations costs.  Of course, each staffing agency operates differently, so ask lots of questions.

 

Get Out of a Professional Rut

If you feel that your career as a nurse has lost its appeal, travel nursing can help.  You’ll have an opportunity to explore other areas of medicine that will get you out of that rut.  For instance, if your field is dialysis, maybe you should consider travel nursing for a while. Dialysis nurse jobs are available across the country.  Pick a spot, and rekindle your love of nursing in a new environment.

No Better Time to Be a Travel Nurse

Nursing jobs are expected to increase by about half a million between now and 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Furthermore, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing claims that about 55% of the current nurse workforce is 50 years of age or older. These nurses will be retiring soon, leaving gaps that need to be filled.  Now, consider this. By 2030, there will be about 69 million senior citizens in the U.S. needing medical care at some point. This all translates to increased opportunities for nurses to see the country while getting paid to do what they love, helping others.

If you’re ready to know more, contact us at New Directions Staffing today.  We will be happy to answer your questions about travel nurse jobs and help you find the right placement for your skills and preferences.   

 

Dialysis Nurse Jobs: Would You Be a Good Fit?

The demand for dialysis nurses, also nephrology nurses, is currently expanding at a rapid pace. According to BLS, increased healthcare availability and current retiring nurses are the two major factors that will see dialysis nurse jobs increase by 15 percent between 2016 and 2026. This job growth coupled with the rewards and satisfaction that comes from helping people are perhaps some of the reasons you have considered a career path as a dialysis nurse. But would you really be a good fit? Here’s what you need to know about becoming a nephrology nurse.

Dialysis Nurse Job Requirements: Become a Licensed RN

To work as a nephrology nurse, you have to first become a licensed Registered Nurse (RN) or Advanced Practice Nurse (APRN). In other words, you must complete an accredited nursing program. This can either be a two-year associate’s degree (ADN), three- year diploma degree or four-year bachelor’s degree in nursing. Regardless of the program, it’s imperative that you enroll for one that offers classes specifically for the field of dialysis nursing.

Upon graduation, you must take and pass the nursing boards examination (NECLEX-RN) before obtaining a state license. Although this is enough to start working, it might be a good idea to pursue a master’s degree in nursing. This does not only help you become an advanced practice nurse but gives you an added edge over the competition. Completing continuing education in this field helps you maintain licensure.

Have the Relevant Experience

In nephrology nursing, experience reigns supreme. It is the single most valued component during kidney transplant procedures, outpatient dialysis units, and acute critical care settings. Therefore, you should have experience working as a registered nurse in a nephrology unit. This will help increase your job prospects in the increasingly competitive marketplace.

Obtain Necessary Certifications

Becoming a dialysis nurse is a series of lifetime learning and skills development. Besides completing the nursing programs, it’s vital that you have the necessary certifications. So, if you want an easy job hunt while looking for dialysis nurse jobs, consider becoming a Certified Dialysis Nurse (CDN). Unfortunately, achieving this is no mean feat.  You must have worked as a registered nurse and have at least 15 hours of continuing nephrology education in the past two years. Also, you must have accumulated a minimum of 2,000 hours of nursing experience in the field over the last two years.

Other Important Qualities in a Dialysis Nurse

Dialysis is such a lengthy and detail-oriented procedure. On top of that, it involves working with people of all ages, including the elderly and children, who are at different stages of kidney disease. For that reason, you must be a compassionate individual with strong emotional stability. Attention to detail is another must-have quality. It can mean the difference between life and death:  adding a decimal point in the wrong place on a patient’s record could mean prescribing a very incorrect medication. Communication also plays an important role when forming a proper diagnosis and conveying vital information to other medical professionals. Above all, you must manifest critical thinking skills. Perhaps, this is because you will be working in emergencies that require snap decisions.

Ready to Start a Career as a Certified Dialysis Nurse?

Are you ready to begin a career as a nephrology nurse? Browse our website to view dialysis nurse jobs that match your search criteria. If you’d like to receive new email job alerts every time they are added to our database, be sure to sign up today. We will notify you every time new jobs are added to our database.

A Day in the Life of a Dialysis Nurse

Do you have a passion for serving others? Are you considering to take a career path by becoming a dialysis nurse? If you answered yes, then you have made the right decision because the field is not only fulfilling but also rewarding.

Besides the satisfaction of helping patients with end-stage renal failure, you enjoy annual perks to the tune of $75,820, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, you’ll have to put in the effort, time, and, more importantly, unwavering zeal to succeed in this field. In this article, we take a peek into the daily life of a dialysis nurse.

A Glimpse of a Typical Day as a Dialysis Nurse

Generally speaking, a certified dialysis nurse is responsible for handling patients with kidney problems. However, a typical day in the life of a nephrology nurse can vary significantly based on the environment, and the patient one is serving. For instance, providing care to patients in chronic, acute, and peritoneal units is not the same. Each unit is unique and requires a different level of effort, commitment, and skill. Similarly, you may be required to work as an educator, advocate, facilitator, mentor, or caregiver, depending on the patient’s condition. Also, the care and support given in-home dialysis, outpatient dialysis, and inpatient hospital dialysis may vary widely.

Overall, the duties and responsibilities of nephrology nurses include:

  • Checking the patient’s symptoms and assessing the severity of their condition
  • Reviewing patients’ lab tests, home activities and medications
  • Educating patients about their condition, treatments and helping them to make lifestyle choices that will aid in recovery
  • Providing dialysis nursing care to patients with kidney diseases
  • Performing dialysis to filter waste products and toxic substances from the blood
  • Maintaining and managing dialysis machines, systems, and equipment.
  • Instructing and counseling patients and their families on dialysis nursing care issues
  • Monitoring patient response to treatment interventions
  • Administering medications as prescribed by physicians or nephrologists
  • Collaborating with the entire nephrology team in delivering care in a considerate, respectful manner
  • Ensuring comfort to patients while executing the above dialysis nurse functions

Working Environment and Conditions

Being in the first line of defense for patients experiencing varying levels of kidney problems, a certified dialysis nurse can spend their day providing care in virtually any place. From the hospital, physician’s office, dialysis unit, nursing home, prison, or even university. Because patients need round-the-clock care, working hours are not limited to day shifts. Sometimes you may have to work at night, over the weekends, or during holidays.

Daily Challenges

Fulfilling as it is, working as a dialysis nurse is not for the faint-hearted. It’s a challenging psychological and physical task. Perhaps, this is because patients who undergo this procedure often include those with severe disorders that lead to sudden kidney failure. Medication reactions, poisons, burns, severe trauma, severe infections, and other diseases that reduce blood flow to the kidneys can all cause the kidneys to shut down suddenly. They might also be suffering from other health conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, or psychiatric condition. For that reason, your everyday job will entail providing emotional support to patients without crossing professional boundaries. You’ll also have to maintain appropriate relationships with people related to your patients. On top of that, you’ll have to spend most of your time standing for long periods, walking, or adjusting body position to stoop or bend.

Are You Looking for Dialysis Nurse Jobs?

Are you working to become a dialysis nurse or already one? Choose New Directions to help you along your journey and kick off a fantastic career as a nephrology nurse. Apply with us today!

Source: Glassdoor