dialysis nursing

Dialysis Nursing: Is It a Good Fit for You?

Dialysis nursing has become an in-demand profession over the past few decades. Analysts project nursing careers to grow by 15% until 2026, much faster than the national average of other professions. This is because more and more nurses are in demand in the healthcare industry as the population ages.
 
This drastic increase in demand for healthcare staff is often more than a medical facility can keep up with. This is why travel nurses play such an important role. Traveling nurses travel across the country, filling in gaps where needed.
 
Dialysis nurses are one of the most sought out traveling nurses today. The number of dialysis patients is on the rise, requiring frequent treatments to prevent kidney failure.
 
Each new job location has its own challenges, but travel nursing is rewarding and lucrative. Here is everything you need to know about dialysis nursing and whether this profession is right for you.
 

What is Dialysis?

 
Dialysis is a treatment used to stabilize the functions of the kidney. This helps avoid kidney failure, a deadly disease. It is a clinical process that purifies the blood. But, this is a temporary solution for supporting the function of the kidneys. This is why dialysis treatments are usually needed frequently, and thus these nurses in high demand. Dialysis is also needed when a patient starts to develop end-stage kidney failure. This is a critical condition where the patient loses about 85 to 90 percent of their kidney function.
 
As the kidneys start to fail, dialysis stabilizes the patient’s body by:
 
  • Removing waste, toxins, salt, and extra water, preventing the substances from building up in the body
  • Maintaining a safe level of necessary minerals in the blood, such as potassium, sodium, and bicarbonate.
  • Aiding other systems in the body with regulating blood pressure.
 

What Does a Dialysis Nurse Do?

 
Dialysis nurses provide patients the necessary treatments they need by administering life-prolonging procedures such as a dialysis treatment process. They are part of a much larger specialty also known in the medical field as nephrology nursing. They also have a wide and in-depth knowledge of kidney diseases and their respective treatments. Dialysis nurses have a responsibility to support, medicate, and track patients throughout their treatment process. They also must educate patients about their conditions and counsel them on various lifestyle choices.
 

Why Become a Traveling Nurse?

 
There are a lot of reasons why you should become a Traveling Dialysis Nurse, but here are some of the highlights you might want to consider:
 

A Flexible Work Schedule

 
Dialysis nurse positions vary depending on the length of time of the assignment and the location. You are able to specify your positions based on your needs. Travelling can be exciting but also tiring. But, having the flexible work schedule of a travel nurse allows you to take necessary rest between assignments. In some agencies, you can even arrange your weekly schedule to allow for long weekends and shorter workweeks.
 

The Adventure of a Lifetime

 
One of the main reasons to become a traveling nurse is having the chance to explore. Being paid to travel the country is one of the best jobs available. You get to take in beautiful sights across the country while earning a competitive salary and benefits.
 

Learn New Skills

 
You will be able to improve your nursing skills while developing a wide variety of other skills. Working in various locations, assignments, and teams force you to think critically. Changing assignments teach you to adapt to diverse working environments and groups.
 

How to Become a Dialysis Nurse?

 
Now you have seen the wonderful opportunities that a traveling nurse has to offer. To become one you have to complete all the necessary requirements of your travel agency.
 
The main requirement is having an Associate’s or Bachelor’s degree in Nursing. Any experience with the dialysis process is also a big plus. You will also have to take the NCLEX-RN exam and get a state license.
 
New Directions Staffing can help you find the best Dialysis Nurse jobs that fit your skills.
work-life balance

Keeping Work–Life Balance as a Travel Nurse

The stresses of life will follow you anywhere you go if you can’t find balance. Usually, being a stationed nurse can be such a hard job. Keeping a healthy work-life balance can be difficult as a nurse. Dealing with difficult co-workers, an insensitive administration, and lots of demanding families and patients can by trying in this field of work. Travel nurses perform all these duties while in different parts of the country or abroad.

Doing this kind of work may eat up a lot of your personal time. You might even neglect your own health, which is ironic to do as a nurse, but all too common. Being a Travel nurse can cost so much of your time but there are ways to cope. Here are some tips that can ease the stress of the travel nursing workloads!

Know Your Priorities

This is the most important advice for any individual that is new to a position in any field. You need to learn what to focus on for you to finish everything on time. When determining what you should focus on ask yourself when and how. When is the deadline for the tasks you need to do? How can you get them done? If one task is easier or has an earlier due date, do that first. How will you do it? If a task requires more work, focus on that because. Rushing delicate work will lead to harsher consequences later.

Ask For a Helping Hand

Nothing makes a job easier than having a colleague or partner to help you finish your work. Seeking support can help you cover current pending projects while receiving helpful advice. It may seem easier to tackle tasks alone but in the long-run, this will burn you out. Remember to not do anything by yourself, there are always workmates to help you.

Remember Your Passions

Answer the one question that can help you continue doing your work with compassion. Why did you enter that field of work? Were you forced to do it? Did you want to do it? Knowing the answer to these questions can help motivate you in doing your work. Reminding yourself why you began in this field in the first place can be a helpful tool for coping with bad days.

Continuously Work on Finding Balance

Most nurses won’t immediately achieve a healthy balance. It takes focus and experience to balance traveling, a personal life, and a professional career. Finding a work-life balance is important in travel nursing. A lack of balance can lead to errors in the job and physical or emotional stress.

A crucial part of maintaining balance in nursing jobs is having a positive mindset and view on life. Try to view obstacles as foundations to build new skills and experiences. Tackle problems at work with the attitude that you WILL solve them. With these tips in mind, you can cope with the stress and hardships of being in the Travel Nursing industry and maintain a healthy work-life balance.

If you are looking for a travel nursing job reach out to us today. New Directions Staffing can find a travel nursing job for you.

travel nursing

Travel Nursing: A How-To

Traveling nurses work temporary jobs in various locations across their state or country. Most assignments are in duration for 13 weeks but may vary. Travel nursing is an excellent way to travel the nation while gaining important job experience. But, knowing the benefits, disadvantages, and everything it takes to do travel nursing is an important first step.

Anyone with a nursing license and at least one year of specialized nursing experience can be a travel nurse. Travel nurses can choose short-term assignments across the U.S. or even abroad!

What is Travel Nursing?

Travel nursing is an important sector of the nursing industry as a whole. Traveling nurses provide temporary medical help on short-term appointments. Assignments last from 8 to 26 weeks, with most positions averaging around 13 weeks. Nurses have the opportunity to choose where and what specialty they want to work in.

All travel nurses have licenses, but different clinical backgrounds. They fill short-term job gaps in various sectors of the nursing field. This specialty profession took root after years of a nationwide nurse shortage. Unfulfilled positions were vast in hospitals, clinics, rehabilitation and other areas of care. Patients needed care and they needed it fast! In an attempt to attract nurses to open positions, employers provided greater salaries, housing, and covered relocation costs to fill temporary positions with qualified nurses.

The Duties of a Traveling Nurse

As a traveling nurse, the type of assignment will vary based upon your specialty. The facility and daily tasks will all depend on the background of the travel nurse. Although temporary, travel nurses always contribute to the mission of the entire medical team. Whether assisting physicians during exams and surgeries or doing laboratory work and urgent first aid care, travel nursing jobs are rewarding. Regardless of the task, critical thinking and fast action are essential to any travel nursing job.

Per Diem vs. Travel Nursing

Per diem nurses and travel nurses are not the same. Per diem nurses have no set schedules and are not required to work a minimum amount of hours each pay period. As their name suggests – they work per day, only assigned work on an as-needed daily basis. A per diem arrangement can offer a lot of flexibility. But, the hours can be inconsistent and unpredictable. Additionally, per diem nurses must adapt to various policies and processes of different installations. Also, while offered high hourly rates, per diem nurses usually aren’t eligible for incentives.

The Importance of Travel Nurses

Travel nurses are a significant component of the medical care team. They bridge the gap between the nursing supply and demand. Compulsory nursing-patient ratios have resulted in enhanced patient safety and reduced patient mortality. So, travel nurses help improve patient safety and patient outcomes.

Travel nurses also bring something special to the table. Nurses from distinct backgrounds of education and care regions bring a lot to the nursing industry. Exchanging thoughts and procedures from various backgrounds and educations benefit the patients and other nurses.

Multi-State Nursing Licensure

In the United States, travel nurses need an RN license covering every state they will be working in. The period for securing a license varies from one state to another. Many estimates range from 2 to 4 weeks, while states such as California and Ohio may take up to six months.

Having a work location in mind can help speed up the permit process. Most travel nurses receive assignments with only a few weeks of notice. Thus, already holding the required permit for a state can be crucial to getting quality assignments. The busiest states for travel nursing are California, Texas, Arizona, and Florida. Holding a license for travel nursing in one or all these states is very valuable.

A few states across the United States refer to themselves as “walk-through” states. These states issue a temporary nursing license within a few days while waiting for travel nurses to get their official license. This allows travel nurses to start their assignments without delay. These temporary licenses are valid from 1 to 6 months, depending on the state.

To help others with their medical needs while also traveling the country or world, apply now to become a travel nurse. New Directions Staffing has a lot of opportunities for aspirants like you!

dialysis nurse

Benefits of Being a Dialysis Nurse in 2019

Working as a dialysis nurse is a booming career. Dialysis has become one of the most acclaimed methods of taking care of kidney patients. It helps in treating a diverse range of diseases and disease processes. These include kidney stones, kidney transplants, Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), and End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

If you are like most dialysis nurses, you want to play a role in helping individuals with kidney health needs. This and the competitive dialysis nurse salary are perhaps the reason you want to pursue this profession. Before you do, it might help if you examine all the benefits that dialysis nursing has to offer in 2019.

Dialysis Nurse Job Prospects Are on The Rise

The growing rates of kidney diseases, increased emphasis on preventive care and the need for healthcare services from baby boomers, have the demand for dialysis nurses growing in 2019. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that dialysis nurse jobs will increase by 15% between 2016 and 2026. Therefore, this means that now is the perfect time to get started if you’re considering becoming a dialysis nurse.

Exposure to Modern Technology

The explosion of technological changes in 2019 is revolutionizing virtually every industry. Dialysis nursing is not immune to this influence. Although many might see the innovations as a threat to their profession, they are, indeed, a blessing in disguise. As a result, new technology exposes dialysis nurses to advanced dialysis treatment, state-of-the-art equipment, and newer patient support services. This, in turn, presents excellent opportunities for exploring new skills within this field.

Skills and Expertise

By helping people with renal and other chronic kidney conditions, dialysis nurses have access to various resources and first-hand experiences in the field. This molds them into experts in their field and allows them to use their extensive expertise in caring for patients. As your experience and expertise improve, so will your salary.

Get Professional Development

Unlike most other professions, dialysis nurses have plenty of opportunity for career growth and advancement. Healthcare facilities often make regular investments in dialysis nurses’ training and development.  As a result, working as a dialysis nurse makes you eligible for awards that recognize outstanding performance, promotion to higher-level positions, and increased salary. However, keep in mind that overall professional growth and development is entirely dependent on your academic qualifications, experience, and dedication at work. 

Enjoy Relationships and Impact

Dialysis nurses usually work in hospital settings, physician offices, and clinics. Sometimes, they work under home healthcare agencies assisting at-home patients with kidney-related problems. Regardless of where you work, you will be surrounded by a team of co-workers daily. Since you are all working toward the same goal (in a collaborative environment), you can enjoy ever-present comradery and support.

On top of that, you get to interact with patients and their families. Above all, providing them with high-quality care gives you a chance to improve their lives daily.

Benefits and Perks

Most hospitals and healthcare facilities offer incredible perks in a bid to attract and retain dialysis nurses. These can range from auto allowances and 401K plans to generous housing stipends. 

Ready to Get Started?

If you have what it takes to start working a dialysis nurse, the team at New Directions is prepared to help you. Just contact us today. We will be more than happy to get you the best fit.

Be sure to sign up for our job alerts to get notified every time the ideal dialysis nurse jobs are available.

Young women looking for travel nursing jobs.

Travel Nursing: Four Open Positions Now

Travel nursing is the perfect career choice for many Registered Nurses. A travel nurse receives competitive compensation for providing top-quality healthcare. Travel nursing jobs give RNs the freedom to choose their working environment while also traveling.
 
Traveling nurses earn above-average salaries. Additionally, they usually receive other benefits such as housing, health insurance, and retirement plans. Here are four popular open positions for Travel Nurses that you can apply for.
 

Travel Nursing in Acute Dialysis Care

 
An Acute Dialysis nurse will work with patients who are in need of emergency dialysis. This is usually caused by some form of injury or trauma to the kidneys. Dialysis treatments act as a filter for the patient’s body, flushing out the harmful toxins. Acute Dialysis Nurses handle regular dialysis treatments.
 
These nurses tend to patients in need of acute dialysis to prevent any renal failure. Good communication skills are vital for the job position. Nurses must be able to tell both patients and families about the procedures.
 

Travel Nursing in Chronic Dialysis Care

 
Chronic dialysis nurses work with patients in need of dialysis treatment for a critical kidney condition. Their patients usually have an end-stage renal disease (ESRD), generally known as kidney failure. They are responsible for monitoring and assisting during the dialysis treatment process.
 
Chronic dialysis nurses work in a more structured environment. Their set of patients has pre-set regular appointments for a scheduled treatment session. Chronic dialysis nurses provide individual care to chronic dialysis patients.
 
Their main duties are to assess the patient’s needs and keep accurate records while monitoring the patient’s condition. They are also responsible for overseeing the dialysis treatment and equipment. They also consult with other medical personnel about the patient’s treatment plan.
 

Nephrology Dietitian

 
A Nephrology Dietitian specializes in patients suffering from kidney disease or chronic conditions. These dietitians advise on the types of foods that aid patients undergoing dialysis treatments.
 
Dietitians will also track the patient’s blood pressure, health conditions and lifestyle. They provide an individualized care plan and diet for each dialysis patient. They will assess the needs of each patient and recommending a therapeutic diet routine.
 

Master Social Worker (Dialysis)

 
A master social worker in a dialysis center will oversee the necessities of each patient. Whether at home or in a traditional medical environment, every single patient’s care falls under the master social worker. They also provide the patient and their family information on the dialysis procedure and updates on the condition of the patient.
 
Dialysis social workers may also assist patients with financial, medical, and transportation needs. A social worker’s main role is acting as a support source for patients during and after dialysis treatment. They assist patients in going through emotional and lifestyle adjustments. They also help with finding their patients specialists or other professional help as needed.
 
If you are ready to make a change in your life, while also helping a variety of patients and traveling the country, contact us today!
Travel nurse jobs

How a Travel Nurse Job Can Be Rewarding & Lucrative

A travel nurse job may be right for you if you have an undying love for healthcare, helping others, and experiencing new cultures! If you answered yes, a travel nurse job could be an excellent choice for you. It offers a unique opportunity for any Registered Nurse (RN) to practice their specialty while at the same time exploring the country. But that’s not all this career has to offer. There’s a whole lot of other reasons to become a travel nurse. In today’s post, we explore several benefits that make travel nursing such a rewarding and lucrative career.

Incredible Perks

One of the primary reasons why a career as a travel dialysis nurse holds a lot of appeal for many RNs is because it provides a wide array of benefits and perks. These include, among others, health, life, and liability insurance. 401K plans may also be included. Sometimes, travel nursing firms (also called staffing companies) offer access to continuing and higher education on top of the competitive travel nurse salary. Others pay for nurse’s licensure. The best bit is, most of these benefits are effective as soon as you sign the contract.

Travel Nurse Jobs Offer Choices and Flexibility

What separates travel nursing from a full-time position is the freedom of choice and flexibility. Almost always, travel nurses get to choose their work location as well as work schedules. Even better, special schedule requests and days off are agreed on well in advance. That means you and the nurse manager at the facility will always work out special needs that arise on a mutual basis. This kind of freedom is among the leading reasons why many Registered Nurses opt for travel nurse jobs. 

An Excellent Adventure

We all love experiencing new adventures. Unfortunately, it’s not always possible to get the time (and money) for a cross-country trip while holding a full-time staff position. But, working as a travel nurse gives you a chance to see different parts of the country while still making a difference in the lives of patients wherever you go.

See a Place Before Becoming a Permanent Resident

Are you looking for a new place to call home but can’t figure out where to settle? Working as a travel dialysis nurse may be a good way to explore different places before you choose where to settle. The 13-week period gives you ample time to know and get the actual feel of the area before you decide to become a permanent resident.

Free Housing

There’s no denying that housing, particularly in urban settings, is expensive. But, working as a travel nurse helps you eliminate this expenditure. This is because many travel nursing firms offer a tax-free stipend for quality housing close to your place of work.

Build Your Skills

If you’re looking for an excellent way to build your nursing skills and experience, travel nurse jobs are worth checking out. This gives you a rare opportunity to work in various top facilities across the country, allowing you a unique experience and perspective on multiple places. What’s even better, you get to work alongside other senior nurses and doctors. This, in turn, helps you grow your travel nurse salary even more.

New Directions Staffing

At New Directions, we recognize that travel nurses make up an essential part of the healthcare industry. That’s why we go the extra mile to ensure that you get the perfect opportunity that fits your specific needs. Whether you prefer working in snowy mountains or sunny beaches, just give us a call at 888-654-1110, and we’ll help you find exactly that.

travel nurse jobs

The Hiring Process For Travel Nurse Jobs

Congrats! You’ve finally completed the necessary nursing education, passed the NCLEX Examination, and secured a full-time position as a Registered Nurse. Like every other growth-oriented individual, you now want to go to the next level. Get out of your comfort zone, explore the world, and of course, make a difference in the lives of patients by obtaining a travel nurse position.

But how do you maneuver through the hiring process? The good news is, this is pretty straightforward. Why? Because it involves a series of simple steps. Understanding the process will help you know what to expect while finding travel nursing jobs.

The following is a breakdown meant to help you get started.

Choose a Travel Nursing Agency

When you decide to become a travel nurse, the first step is finding the right travel nursing company. Simple as this may sound, it is, without a doubt, an essential step of the hiring process. For that reason, you need to conduct extensive research so you can find the one that best fits your individual needs and wants.

For instance, you need to establish the reputation of the company. Who is their management? How long have they been in the business? Ideally, you can get this info by perusing the firm’s website and reading their reviews online. Checking out their social media accounts and tapping your connections will help you learn more about the company. Whatever you find, keep in mind that a positive reputation is a reflection of all the incredible offers that awaits you at the firm. The converse is also true.

Compare Multiple Travel Nurse Jobs Before Choosing

Once you have selected the staffing firm to work with, it’s time to compare your options. Many staffing agencies offer multiple travel nurse jobs with varying benefits. These run the gamut from travel nurse salary, travel reimbursement, housing stipend, and healthcare. Others will provide loyalty programs, continuing education as well as assignments that will challenge you and induce growth. Regardless of what your needs are, be sure to only choose assignments that best fit your individual needs and expectations.

Completing the Application

After you’ve picked a job offer, it’s time to complete an application. Your recruiter will discuss with you virtually everything about the position. From your needs and expectations to goals for your career and what best suits your skillset. It’s crucial that you keep in mind that completing an application doesn’t mean that you’re committing to start travel nursing, there’s the interview.  

The Interview

Last, but certainly not least is the interview. The best part about the interview process for travel nurse jobs is that it is much simpler than it is for a full-time position. Perhaps, this is because it is conducted by a nurse manager from your staffing agency. Even better, they already know about your skills checklist and have established whether you’re qualified for the position or not.

Although the interview may seem like a grilling session to you, it is indeed the best opportunity for you to decide if you want that position. Therefore, be sure to ask questions about the cancellation policy, opportunities for overtime, and everything else you consider important. If the position matches, it’s time to pack your bags and begin your travel nursing adventure.

Need Help Finding Travel Nurse Jobs?

Are you a Registered Nurse who is interested in working as a travel nurse? We can help you find the right assignments you have been looking for! We will find travel nurse jobs, and let you choose your ideal travel nursing location. Call us to start traveling as you make a living today!

A checklist for travel nursing.

Is Travel Nursing For Me? A Checklist

Travel nursing is, without a doubt, an exciting career. It holds a lot of appeal for a diverse range of nurses looking for an opportunity to advance their career. They can also explore the country and still earn a competitive salary. It’s also an excellent opportunity to get out of your comfort zone. You can gain valuable skills, and of course, make an impact in the lives of your patients.

But what exactly does one require to become a travel nurse? The answer is, it depends. The overall requirements vary by the agency, facility, specialty, and contract. However, there are a few basic requirements.

Here are common universal prerequisites to becoming a travel nurse.

Travel Nurse License

To get the most out of your travel nursing career, it’s vital that you possess an RN license. Obtaining this license requires a few things. Graduating from an accredited institution and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX) Examination. A bachelor’s degree isn’t a mandatory requirement. Having a BSN will give you an added edge over the rest.

Experience with Travel Nurse Jobs

As soon as you start working as a travel nurse, it’s imperative that you hit the ground running. In other words, you need to manifest a sheer level of confidence in your skills and ability to do your job. Perhaps, this is because most health facilities do not have time to train nurses. For that reason, you are required to have at least one-year experience. Some specialties may require up to 2 years of experience

Certifications

Most travel nurse jobs require current nursing certifications such as Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Basic Life Support (BLS). In selected instances, hospitals and healthcare facilities will ask for NIH stroke certification. Also, specialty certifications like CCRN for acute/critical care nurses can help you enhance your travel nurse salary.

Documentation

Besides having the nursing license, certifications, and required minimum experience in your specialty, it’s imperative that you have all the required paperwork. Typically, this may include, an up-to-date resume, driver’s license, proof of immunity, flu shot, PPD Test, BCLS card, physician statement, and respirator fit test. 

While having all these docs is essential, you need to make sure that they are safe, secure, and ready to help you find travel nurse jobs with a click of a button. Put simply, they should be stored in one place, preferably in your laptop, hard drive, or in the cloud space.

Other Important Factors to Consider

Although meeting the above make you eligible to begin working, you’ll need to analyze your life to decide if this is a good fit or not. It’s important that you think about your obligations. See if there’s anything in your life that could prevent your lifestyle from working out. Some basic questions to ask include;

  • Are there specialized healthcare needs that are location specific?
  • Is there a home or house that you are not comfortable leaving unattended for weeks or even months?
  • Are there school-aged children, parents, or others who depend on you for care?
  • Do you have a significant other that can’t travel or isn’t willing?

Is Travel Nursing Your Best Fit?

Now that you know what it takes to become a travel nurse, it’s time to begin your career. Contact us today to help us get you some great travel nursing assignments.

Just because the present isn’t the perfect time, that doesn’t mean that things won’t pan out in your favor. Keep at New Directions Staffing to learn more. Be sure to sign up for our job alerts to get a notification when the ideal job is available.

Young women looking for travel nursing jobs.

5 Characteristics of a Good Dialysis Nurse

It’s inherent in our basic nature to want to be the best version of who and what we are striving to be. For those of you with the basic training as a certified dialysis nurse already under your belt, congratulations! You’re on the path to succeeding in this. For those that are just starting on your journey, there is much still in store for you. 

Regardless of where you stand thus far, there are a number of dos and don’ts you can follow to stay one step ahead of the curve. First and foremost is, of course, your training as a dialysis nurse. This is typically the first qualification you will be judged on, as your ability to perform all duties is most vital. 

However, there are a number of further actions that one should bear in mind if they want to be the best, and open the door to the top dialysis nurse jobs. Most of these may be part of your inherent nature, and if not, they are usually absorbed and applied over years, or months, of experience. But that doesn’t mean you can’t get a head start now in applying them to your budding career. 

So, what are the characteristics of a good dialysis nurse?

Dialysis Nurse Characteristics – Are You a Good Fit? 

  1. Empathy and compassion.

Patients undergoing dialysis treatments are in a difficult place physically, and this often goes hand-in-hand with a share of mental and emotional trauma as well. A nurse who can provide that extra factor of care and will listen to a patient’s troubles and provide succor stands far above those who would robotically carry out the treatments without concern for the patient’s well-being. Any patient will most definitely take note of and appreciate the extra care.

  1. Emotional strength and stability. 

The job of a nurse can be extremely stressful. You are likely to encounter new challenges and difficult situations on a daily basis. Your emotions will reflect onto your patients, and it is therefore of utmost importance that a nurse can maintain their composure and do what needs to be done in the face of a difficult situation. 

  1. Communication skills.

In order to work well with doctors and other nurses, it is key to have exceptional communication skills. You must be able to relay important information to other medical staff and give directions if necessary. It is equally important to be able to receive and duplicate information and directions from your fellow professionals.

Another aspect of this is your communication with your patients. You will have to relay information to each patient and their family in a way that is appropriate and easy to understand. You are likely to experience negative emotions and you must be able to handle this appropriately as well. 

  1. Respect. 

A good nurse will be respectful towards fellow staff and their patients. 

Your patients will find themselves in potentially undignified scenarios while receiving treatment. A good dialysis nurse must be respectful regardless of the situation and do their best to listen to their patient and understand whatever they are going through without judgment.

  1. Attention to detail.

Dialysis nurses are heavily relied on by doctors and patients alike. Their attention to detail could make the difference between a successful or unsuccessful treatment. They should observe their patient and the progression of the treatment. They should ask questions about the patient’s symptoms and any improvement or deterioration. A good nurse should be the first to find out about any changes and should be a reliable informant for the assigned doctor. 

All of the characteristics above, when applied by you as a certified dialysis nurse, will elevate you from cadet to general in your medical career. Apply your training to the tee. Practice these characteristics on a daily basis to become the absolute best you can be as a certified dialysis nurse. 

dialysis nurse

Developing Nurse-Patient Relationships as a Dialysis Nurse

“My dialysis nurses are the best. They make me feel so comfortable during treatment. I feel like they really care about me.” Imagine your patients saying this about you.

For a patient receiving dialysis, their nurse can be the difference between a positive or negative experience. Dialysis nurses and their patients can form an unbreakable bond. One that will leave them remembering each other for the rest of their lifetimes. Of course, this is all dependent upon on the communication style of nurse that is working. 

Dialysis is an extremely time-consuming treatment for patients, oftentimes causing them to miss out on family and social events. Patients spend a majority of their time traveling to and from dialysis settings. Then, waiting to be attached to the machine, undergoing the actual dialysis treatment itself. If that weren’t enough they then spend time waiting to be discharged before going home.

Due to the involved nature of dialysis treatments, nurses can adjust their communication skills to make things more effortless and relaxed for the patient. Developing a true nurse-patient relationship can result in a smoother process for everybody involved.

One Study’s Findings on Dialysis Nurse Jobs

One study found in the Nursing Times found that dialysis nurses in the Republic of Ireland rarely communicated with their patients. They interviewed 16 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). They were undergoing hemodialysis therapy in a hospital-based setting, analyzing their findings along the way. 

In the end, the study found that the nurses only communicated with the patient when they had a physical or technical need. Patients described the communication as “shallow” and that it “rarely progressed beyond a superficial or clinical level.”

We understand that nurses are oftentimes extremely busy in a dialysis-based setting: answering the beeps of various machines, repeatedly checking each patient’s vitals, etc. Although, this study was published in the hopes of raising awareness about the type of communication they were receiving, not necessarily how much.

Quality Versus Quantity

This study described the quality versus quantity of nurse-patient communication. While patients said they understood their nurses couldn’t sit down with them and chat for thirty minutes, they said they’d appreciate more heart-to-heart and personal conversing. 

Since you can’t be with your patients for long, simple things will do the trick. Introduce yourself from the start, greet your patient by name, explain what you are doing throughout the process, and engage in active listening by repeating what they say back to them.

As a dialysis nurse, we understand the stress and drain that goes along with your job. Don’t put more pressure on yourself to do more, instead, enhance and improve what you already do.

Nonverbal Communication

The communication your patient appreciates isn’t always verbal. Here are a few nonverbal communication techniques to further develop your patient relationships as a certified dialysis nurse: 

  • Make eye contact — Even though you can’t be physically with your patient during their whole treatment, make eye contact with them from across the room. This lets them know you’re keeping an eye on them.
  • Smile — A smile can ease tension, build rapport, and increases happiness. Smiling at your patient can never be unappreciated.
  • Be confident — Nothing causes unease in a patient more than their nurse seeming unsure of what they are doing. Always be confident and professional in front of your patient.

If you or someone you know is on the hunt for dialysis nurse jobs or other healthcare clinical and administrative careers, consider looking into New Directions Staffing Services. Our travel nursing agency can provide individuals with travel, temporary-to-hire, and full-time opportunities in their field. Call (888) 654-1110 or visit our website for more information today!