A dialysis nurse poses for a picture.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Becoming a Dialysis Nurse

Congratulations! You’ve passed the stage. You have your nursing degree in hand. Now you are left with only one thing to worry about! That’s finding a job as a travel dialysis nurse. More to the point? You’re wondering what will be expected of you the moment you get a job. The good news is that you have come to the right place. New Directions provides you with all the information you need to excel in this field. This includes the basic requirements and available employment opportunities.

Here are five important things you need to know about becoming a nephrology nurse.

Basic Job Requirements of a Dialysis Nurse

Dialysis nurses work in a hospital or home settings alongside other medical stuff. To become a nephrology nurse, one is required to have:

  • an associate’s or bachelor’s degree in nursing
  • pass the state licensing exam for nursing.

Experience with technical medical equipment is critical. Earning professional certification as a Certified Dialysis Nurse as well helps to improve your job prospects.

Important Qualities

Successful dialysis nurses possess a broad spectrum of clinical and administrative skills. The fact that you’ll be working alongside other individuals? Also, it means you must have clear communication skills and impeccable attention to details. Other essential qualities include:

  • critical thinking
  • organization
  • strong work ethic
  • the ability to work well in a team-focused environment
  • enjoys intellectual challenges.

Physical Demands

No doubt, dialysis is a very technical task. It involves intravenously wiring up patients to a dialysis machine. The dialysis machine filters the blood. The procedure takes a couple of hours. Patients must remain still the entire time. The process is demanding. So, physical stamina is mandatory to help you stand for more extended periods. Also, your job description may sometimes involve transferring of patients. That means you must be in a position to lift, move, transfer, or assist with the weight of more than one-hundred (100) pounds. In addition, visual acuity and excellent motor skills may help bring sheer convenience in your job.

Working Conditions in Dialysis Nursing

Dialysis can be administered in virtually any environment:

  • a hospital
  • patient’s home
  • freestanding clinic in prison or university.

Because patients need close monitoring at all times, working shifts may include days, nights, weekends, and holidays. Also, exposure to chemicals, needles, bodily fluids, and other infectious diseases may pose some serious health hazards.

Additionally, burnout is inevitable while working as a dialysis nurse. You spend a significant amount of time standing, walking, stretching, bending, or assisting with patient transfers. Therefore, you must have to ability to follow strict safety precautions. This is to prevent probable infection or injuries.

Salary Info and Career Outlook

Working as a travel dialysis nurse is very rewarding. It gives you a chance to provide life-saving support to patients. Also, it’s a stable career path with decent annual pay. According to BLS, the average salary range for a nephrology nurse falls between $44,000 and $95,000 per year. However, this varies widely based on the state, setting, or level of expertise.

There is an outburst of lifestyle disease and a rise of the elderly population in the country.  The demands for dialysis treatments are bound to increase. In fact, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 15% increase in dialysis nurse jobs between 2016 and 2026. In summation, it means you can never go wrong with a career as a nephrology nurse.

Dialysis Nursing Jobs

Are you searching for dialysis nursing jobs? Browse the New Directions’ website to see all the latest job opportunities for nephrology nurses available. Want to get notified the moment dialysis nursing jobs that match your search criteria are added to our database? Sign up for email job alerts today.